Tag Archives: edit

August 2014 – Fractals

DSC_2265
Wow do I have a lot of process to document here.
I was having such a hard time coming up with something for this month. I decided to save my awesome portrait idea for September (autumn light should be even better for shooting). So I was completely at a loss for what to shoot this month. Feeling completely uninspired I turned to an old standby for coming up with good ideas….Brainstorming!

My wife and my sister happened to be around so I recruited them and between the 3 of us we came up with a page full of strong visual images themes and ideas. It was actually pretty cool and may have inadvertently inspired some future photo shoots. Still lacking ideas and the time to execute any other plans I decided to try and do something I always said I wanted to do.

Admittedly this should be a photo series, but I have always said you don’t need more lenses you just need mirrors – different shapes sizes and curves and you can create pretty much any angle you need.
I also have a deep seated fascination with fractals. So I thought I would put the two together and try to make a fractal reflected in mirror.

I wanted bold colors so I decided I would try a high key shot (exposed to the right) using acrylic paints to create really bright vivid colors……..

As you can see from the picture above my first attempt turned out ok, but I really was shooting for somethign with an even stronger fractal. So the plan now is to get several more mirrors and using even larger painted surfaces try to capture multiple reflections in one shot.

Don’t stop at your first effort
Keep going and try to create something even more engaging.

If you care you can also check out my youtube video of a timelapse I shot on vacation. It’s short, so you won’t have to spend hours getting through it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jj3GDZgQF0E

June 2014 – Ahead of Schedule

Well after about 100 million frustrating attempts to actually capture a bubble where I wanted it to be I ended up with a handful of useable shots.

Below you will see how I post processed them.

bubble post 1

From the Raw image the first adjustment is for white balance exposure and basic contrast.

This is a bit of a trick as with so much of the image being black the histogram is of very little help. The idea here is to boost as much of the light while keeping the background crisp and black.

Next is noise reduction. I like how lightroom handles noise reduction as the color noise tends to be more of an issue. In this case the low iso (only 400) and the relatively large image (36 MP) means very little noise reduction is required to publish and image on the web (say 1024 x 768). There is very little noise in the image to begin with but with the help of the sliders we can clean that up nicely.

I also turn off all the sharpening in camera raw as I prefer to sharpen later in the process (as is the case almost always if you intend to do any post processing beyond the camera raw). Open the image for further editing.
bubble post 2

I then did the same thing with a second image.

bubble post 3

I copied the second image and pasted it into a new layer on the first image.

bubble post 4

Then blend the layer together using lighter color. This is a great method of exposure stacking and will add the second bubble to the first. I used layer masks to ensure the background and bubble edges stacked correctly.

bubble post 5
I moved each layer around until the bubbles were in their desired positions. I had some issue with a few of the bubbles at the top or bottom of the frame as they could not be moved to the center of the frame without looking flat due to their missing edge.

bubble post 6

Next I flattened the image and adjusted the “levels” allowing me to clip the blacks for a much sharper image and making the blending of the two images look a bit more natural by setting the “true black” across the board for both images.

bubble post 7

Resize.
Crop.
And last of all, sharpen.

Here you go.

bubble post 8

The final image is a bit more complicated, but I’ll post that later. For now, give it a try – see how well your images turn out.